City Pest Management FAQ

Why doesn’t Leduc move towards a full pesticide ban?

While some cities in Canada have banned pesticides entirely, the City of Leduc has not taken this policy action for a variety of reasons. One reason is that IPM uses a variety of strategies to best address specific pest problems. One of the strategies is to apply pesticides when needed, so banning pesticides would decrease the management options available. Secondly, the IPM plan encourages the use of the least toxic products to be used whenever possible. Finally, all pesticides used in Canada must be approved by the Pest Management Regulatory Agency of Canada. To gain approval from this agency it must be demonstrated that the products do not pose a significant health risk when used in the manner they are intended for. Leduc only uses pest control products which have gained this approval.

Does the city indiscriminately spray all city lands as a pesticide measure?

No. The city does not condone the indiscriminate use pesticides. The city only treats lands with pesticides as required and does not normally blanket spray. The maintenance standards for different land based on use, priority and location determine the efforts that are taken to remove or prevent pests and weeds.

Why doesn’t the city undertake more spraying operations to eliminate broad leaf weeds such as dandelions?

The city seeks to maintain weeds at an acceptable level. Dandelions are not listed by the Alberta Weed Act and so are considered a nuisance weed. The level of pest management taken to control dandelions is based on the tolerance levels for each type of land as per the IPM plan. Mass spraying operations are costly and environmentally damaging.

Why does the city need to do any spraying for dandelions if they are simply a nuisance weed?

A certain level of dandelion control is necessary on certain types of city facilities. Turf is one type of city land which must remain 95% clear of weeds such as dandelions. Turf is an important asset and maintenance to this standard is necessary so financial investment is protected. Turf left unattended will become degraded over time and could create a situation in which the site becomes so injured that it is too costly to reclaim. Additionally, broad leaf weeds such as dandelions pose a safety risk to athletes using the fields.

Do the pest control products used on city facilities pose threats to individuals who use public land?

The Pest Management Regulatory Agency of Health Canada is the governing body which approves and grants registration for pesticides used in Canada. Before receiving this federal registration, manufacturers must be able to demonstrate that their product does not pose a significant health risk. The City of Leduc only uses pest control products which have received this registration.

Does the city spray for mosquitoes? Why or why not?

Leduc does not spray for mosquitoes. It's been decided the economic, environmental and health impacts of doing so are too high. For the most part, mosquitoes in our area are only nuisance mosquitoes and mass spraying is not justifiable.

What do I do with unused pesticides?

Take any unused pesticides to the Eco Station or the Waste Management Facility.

What penalties do I face if noxious weeds are growing on my property?

If you have prohibited noxious and/or noxious weeds growing on your property you may be subject to penalties under the Weed Control Act and the City of Leduc Community Standards Bylaw

As per the Community Standards Bylaw you may be subject to a $250 fine for weeds or grass over 10 cm high. Charges under the Weed Control Act are typically reserved for severe or abnormal situations. If you fail to comply and remove the weeds you may also be subject to the cost of a contractor to come remove the weeds.